FROM RACHAEL CLAIRE | PARENTING & LIFESTYLE BLOGGER

How To Allergy-Proof Windows In The Home

With access to the outside world, your windows provide the key point of entry for pesky allergies and dust. However, you can help prevent allergy and asthma symptoms from flaring up or getting any worse by allergy-proofing your windows. Here are some top tips to help you allergy-proof your home’s windows.

 

KEEP YOUR WINDOWS CLEAN

 

Excessive dust makes an environment conducive to allergy-producing dust mites and the more dust there is, the more mites there are. Windows attract a great deal of dust, especially along windowsills. Keep your windows clean by damp dusting them with a solution that is a mixture of bleach and five percent water each week. By doing this, you will help clear your home of mould spores and dust mites which can flare up allergies and asthma.

You can spray the cleaning solution onto a clean cloth and wipe down the window, too. Cleaning this way prevents dust from becoming airborne and potentially irritating you. Be sure to wear a dust mask when tackling this task.

PUT AIR PURIFIERS NEAR THE WINDOW

 

Purchase a good-quality air purifier and place it close to the window. Having it like this can help trap floating pollutants from outside before they even have a chance to circulate in your home.

DECORATE WITH ALLERGY-RESISTANT COVERINGS

 

Try not to hang dry-clean-only heavy drapes or smaller slatted blinds as they are magnets for dust and are tricky to keep clean. Instead, opt for easy-to-clean, low-maintenance window dressings such as the wooden venetian blinds being showcased at Made to Measure Blinds.

If you have fabric window treatments, be sure to wash them in hot water on a monthly basis to kill dust mites that cling to the fabric. As for shutters and blinds, clean those weekly using a vacuum nozzle and wipe them down with a damp cloth that has some of the bleach and water solution sprayed on it.

CHECK THE CAULKING

 

Caulking around your windows can wear over time, and even the slightest cracks can let in a large amount of mould spores, pollen and dust. Inspect the caulking carefully, looking for any visible openings. Even if you don’t see anything, if the caulking is seven years or older, it’s time to replace it.

You can apply the caulk to windows that don’t open and close as well as weather stripping on the windows that open and shut. Make sure your window frames are secure, too, as movement or rattling could cause leakages. Also, replace cracked panes as even a hairline crack can allow irritants in.

KNOW WHEN TO KEEP YOUR WINDOWS SHUT

 

 

If you do suffer from allergies, it’s a good idea to keep your windows closed most of the time. However, there are a few times during the day when you may want to open them for fresh air. You can keep your windows close during certain times, such as:

  • Damp, rainy weather
  • Warm weather, especially during high humidity
  • Night time when conditions are moist and dewy
  • Early morning hours when grass, trees and weeds release pollen

The best time to open your windows is from mid-afternoon through early evening when conditions tend to be at their driest.

Keeping allergens out of the home and from wreaking havoc on your allergies and asthma does take a little effort and planning, but the results are certainly worth it!

 

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